News

Agroindustrial exports would close 2024 with a record figure

Market & Price Trends
Published Apr 15, 2024

Tridge summary

Peruvian exports are expected to see a growth of +3.1% in the current year, reaching US$ 66,472 million, driven by increases in both traditional and non-traditional shipments, according to the Export Projection Report from CIEN-ADEX. This growth comes amidst challenges such as the global economic slowdown, legal instability, and construction issues at the port of Chancay. Key sectors like mining, fishing and aquaculture, agribusiness, and metalworking are expected to perform well, although the wood and hydrocarbons sectors may face declines. Additionally, the article anticipates a recovery in Peruvian exports in 2024, especially in the traditional fishing sector, thanks to the normalization of sea temperatures after the Coastal Niño phenomenon of 2023, which is expected to significantly boost the anchovy population and, consequently, fishmeal exports.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

(Agraria.pe) Peruvian exports would total US$ 66,472 million this year, which would mean a growth of +3.1%, compared to 2023 when the amount amounted to US$ 64,474 million, according to the Export Projection Report, the Research Center for Global Economy and Business of the Association of Exporters (CIEN-ADEX). These results are conditioned by external factors such as the global economic slowdown, the uncertainty in monetary policy decisions by Peru's main trading partners, the volatility in international prices – especially of key products such as copper and gold – , trade restrictive measures and others. During the III Diplomatic Exporter Meeting, organized by the union entity, the head of Economic Studies and Commercial Intelligence of CIEN-ADEX, Gabriel Arrieta Padilla, also detailed the existence of internal factors such as legal instability that holds back investments, political tensions and social and problems in the port of Chancay. “This future hub will encourage the ...
Source: Agraria
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