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Agronometrics: Northwestern United States cherry growers anticipate favorable harvest

Published May 23, 2024

Tridge summary

The article provides an overview of the cherry season in the northwest United States, highlighting the market factors and weather conditions that impact the industry. Last year's erratic weather resulted in a bumper crop, leading to a market glut and significant economic losses for growers, with up to 35% of the crop remaining unharvested. Despite these challenges, this year's harvest is expected to increase by 12% to 20.9 million boxes, thanks to optimal spring weather. However, concerns about January frosts and fluctuating weather patterns continue to pose risks to the season. The article also mentions the financial impact on the cherry industry in Oregon and the efforts to secure federal loans and aid from the USDA to help mitigate the losses.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

In this installment of the 'Agronometrics in Charts' series, Sarah Ilyas reviews the cherry season in the northwest United States. Each week, the series examines a different horticultural product, focusing on a specific origin or theme and visualizing the market factors driving change. Last year's erratic weather caused a glut of cherries on the U.S. West Coast, with California and Washington simultaneously experiencing a bumper crop of the fruit. The market had difficulty absorbing last season's volume, which resulted in unharvested fruit and declining prices. Jon DeVaney, president of the Washington State Tree Fruit Association, said growers in the Pacific Northwest suffered significant economic losses, leaving up to 35% of the crop unpicked. Fortunately, this season's optimal spring weather conditions have brought relief to producers. Northwest Cherry Growers estimates the 2024 harvest at 20.9 million boxes, 12% more than the previous year. It is believed that the planned ...
Source: MXfruit
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