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Storm Bernard causes serious damage to red fruit producers in Morocco and calls for support for those affected

Fruits
Morocco
Innovation & Technology
Sustainability & Environmental Impact
Market & Price Trends
Published Oct 26, 2023

Tridge summary

The recent Storm Bernard in Morocco has caused significant damage to red fruit crops in the north of the country, with 20% of the crop being affected. The storm impacted 9,000 hectares of land and resulted in the uprooting of crops and damage to metal structures and plastic coverings. This has led to concerns over a disruption in Morocco's berry exports for the next three weeks.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

Our Moroccan News - Abdelmoumen Haj Ali Storm Bernard, which struck several regions in Morocco last Sunday, caused severe damage to red fruit crops in the north of the country, amounting to 20% of the crop, the vast majority of which is exported to Europe. The Moroccan Association of Red Fruit Producers and the Moroccan Association of Red Fruit Producers and Exporters reported, on Wednesday, in a statement, that the storm affected 9,000 hectares of area planted with strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries in the Gharb “Locos” region. The winds, which reached speeds of 110 kilometers per hour, ripped plastic from ponds and greenhouses designated for growing red fruits, 90% of which are exported. The farmers suffered “severe damage,” including the deterioration and deformation of 15% of the metal structures of the ponds, the uprooting of crops, and the loss of approximately 20% of berry production. The document adds that the power outage, which lasted for nearly two ...
Source: Akhbarona
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