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Cereals weigh on the French agri-food surplus in 2023Less French wheat exported in 2023/24 than expected, but more barley and cornThe “Russian threat” weighs on the export markets for French wheat

Published May 25, 2024

Tridge summary

The French cereal trade surplus, which reaches its second best level in the last ten years, has decreased from 10.7 billion euros in 2022 to 7.1 billion euros in 2023 due to lower wheat and corn exports. This decrease is largely attributed to strong competition from grains, especially wheat, from the Black Sea, especially Russia, and the removal of European customs duties for Ukrainian agricultural products. Despite these setbacks, barley exports have seen a significant increase, with sales to China quadrupling, helping to offset the decline in other exports.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

The cereal trade surplus - the difference between France's exports and imports - increased from 10.7 billion euros in 2022 to 7.1 billion euros in 2023, according to a report from the service Agreste statistics from the Ministry of Agriculture. Agreste's note recalls that a “historic high” had been reached in 2022, in the particular context of the start of the war in Ukraine, which had largely benefited French wheat sales while world cereal prices were soaring. Last year, grain exports, particularly soft wheat of which France is the leading European producer and exporter, suffered from a general decline in prices and above all from very tough competition from grains from the Black Sea, in particular from Russia. This decline in the cereal trade surplus must however be put into perspective: it remains “8% higher than its 2021 level and reached its second best level in the last ten years”, underlines the Agreste statistical service. In detail, wheat sales are down 48% year-on-year, ...
Source: TerreNet
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