News

Commodities traders pledge at COP28 to protect South American grasslands

Soybean
Argentina
Innovation & Technology
Brazil
Sustainability & Environmental Impact
Published Dec 10, 2023

Tridge summary

Eight top commodities traders have pledged to stop purchasing soy from farms that destroy South American grasslands, in addition to their previous commitment to shun growers who clear forests. This move aims to bolster conservation for Brazil's Cerrado, which has already lost at least half of its biodiversity to agriculture. The firms have agreed to stop buying soy from farms that destroy non-forest natural vegetation in the Amazon rainforest, Chaco dry woodlands, or the Cerrado by the end of the decade.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

By Jake Spring DUBAI (Reuters) - Eight of the world's top commodities traders have pledged to stop buying soy from farms that ruin South American grasslands, adding to previous commitments to shun growers that clear forests, a sector group said on Saturday on the sidelines of the COP28 climate summit. The move could bolster conservation for Brazil's Cerrado, the world's most biodiverse savanna, at least half of which has already been destroyed for agriculture. Farming, forestry and land use account for more than a fifth of planet warming-emissions. The firms, including Archer Daniels Midland, Bunge, Cargill and Louis Dreyfus Company, agreed that by the end of the decade they will longer buy soy from farms that destroyed any non-forest natural vegetation in the Amazon rainforest, Chaco dry woodlands or the Cerrado, said Petra Tanos of the Tropical Forest Alliance. The commitment adds to the sector's pledge last year to eliminate deforestation by 2025. Tanos said the move is ...
Source: Saltwire
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