News

Brazilian university researches cultured meat with steak texture

Meat
Brazil
Innovation & Technology
Published Mar 2, 2024

Tridge summary

The Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) and the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) are working on a project to produce lab-grown meat. Led by Professor Silvani Verruck, the project aims to create structured cuts of meat, such as steak, from animal cells using plant-based biomaterials and 3D bioprinting. Funded by Finep with R$2.4 million, the initiative is seen as a promising solution to the challenge of ensuring food security for a growing global population.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

The Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) and the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (Embrapa) joined forces to pioneer a new frontier in food production: laboratory-grown meat. The pioneering project, led by Professor Silvani Verruck, from the Department of Food Science and Technology, seeks to transform animal cells into structured cuts of meat, such as a steak, for example. Funded by Finep with R$2.4 million, the study has a term of 36 months and involves researchers from different areas of knowledge. The initiative responds to an urgent challenge: ensuring food security for a constantly growing global population. Cultured meat is emerging as a promising alternative to traditional meat production. Through tissue engineering, animal cells are cultivated in controlled environments, generating tissues or proteins of high nutritional value. The UFSC project focuses on one of the biggest challenges in the area: creating support structures (“scaffolds”) that mimic the ...
Source: CanalRural
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