News

More potatoes were lost in the mud in Western Europe than the total Hungarian crop

Fresh Common Potato
Vegetables
Belgium
Sustainability & Environmental Impact
France
Market & Price Trends
Published Feb 12, 2024

Tridge summary

Western Europe has experienced a mixed potato yield in 2023 due to heavy rains. The Netherlands suffered a 15% loss, while Belgium and France saw increases of 18% and 13% respectively, and Germany maintained its usual production. Overall, a 5% increase from 2022 is expected, totaling 22.66 million tons, but this is lower than initial estimates of 45.8 tons per hectare. Meanwhile, potato cultivation in Hungary has drastically reduced from 47,000 hectares to 8,000 hectares since the turn of the millennium.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

In Hungary, we sow potatoes on approximately 8,000 hectares - due to the heavy rains, much more potatoes have now drowned in the mud in Western Europe. The Netherlands is the biggest loser. Several industry players have already sounded the alarm in Western Europe that they will be unable to harvest all the potatoes from the fields due to the unusually rainy weather. We also wrote that potatoes are drowning in mud from the Netherlands and Belgium to Germany to France, and we already know the extent of the damage. According to surveys, potatoes were lost on a total of 11,000 hectares in the European Union, and especially in the Netherlands, they produced spectacularly less than the previous year. Their yield fell by 15 percent, which hit the farmers like a cold shower. The other countries listed also suffered from heavy, drenching rains, as a result of which the harvesters could not always reach the fields on time. Along with all this, the total yield in Belgium increased by 18 ...
Source: AgroForum
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