News

Nigeria and Côte d'Ivoire behind record level of world rice trade

Rice
Ivory Coast
Nigeria
Published Feb 11, 2022

Tridge summary

For the second consecutive year, world rice exports would exceed 50 million tonnes (Mt) at 50.947 Mt, only very slightly down from the record of 51.656 Mt in 2021. The reason for this is mainly demand growing imports from Africa, particularly Nigeria and the Ivory Coast, as well as from Asia, including China and Nepal, reaffirms the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) in its report on the world grain market released yesterday. And this increased demand is largely met by India which has more than doubled its exports since 2019. “While deliveries from the other largest exporters Vietnam and Thailand are expected to increase in 2022, India should still dominate world trade,” summarizes the USDA. Indeed, India combines three factors to be a leader: record production, an almost record harvested area, and recent investments in deep-water ports making it possible to transport bulk in addition to container ships.

Original content

For the second year in a row, world rice exports would exceed 50 million tonnes (Mt) at 50.947 Mt, down only very slightly from the record of 51.656 Mt in 2021. The main reason for this is growing import demand from Africa, especially Nigeria and the Ivory Coast, as well as from Asia, including China and Nepal, reaffirms the United States Department of Agriculture ( USDA) in its report on the world grain market released yesterday. And this increased demand is largely met by India which has more than doubled its exports since 2019 (read: India exported a record amount of rice in 2021, up 46%). “While deliveries from the other largest exporters Vietnam and Thailand are expected to increase in 2022, India should still dominate world trade,” summarizes the USDA. Indeed, India combines three factors that make it possible to be the leader: record production, an almost record harvested area and recent investments in deep-water ports making it possible to transport bulk in addition to ...
Source: Commodafrica
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