News

United States: Relentless surge of fruit flies a pain for California growers

Fruits
United States
Sustainability & Environmental Impact
Published Nov 28, 2023

Tridge summary

The California Department of Food and Agriculture is reminding people about the seven active fruit fly quarantines in place to control various fruit fly species that can damage fruit production. The recent quarantine for the Queensland fruit fly, which can lay up to 100 eggs per day, is the first of its kind in the U.S. The fly poses a threat to various crops, including citrus, which is vulnerable to the disease huanglongbing.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

The California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) is reminding people to heed the seven active fruit fly quarantines aimed at controlling the Mediterranean fruit fly, Oriental fruit fly, Tau fly, and Queensland fruit fly. The Queensland fruit fly (Bactrocera tryoni) quarantine is the first of its kind in the U.S. Although QFF was first seen in California in 1985, the recent detection of two adult males triggered the unprecedented quarantine action by USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and CDFA. “This pest has earned a bad reputation for wreaking havoc on fruit production in Australia, where it is native,” says Hamutahl Cohen, University of California Cooperative Extension Entomology Advisor for Ventura County. “Adult flies lay their eggs in fruit, and the eggs hatch into larvae that then feed on the fruit, causing damage.” And while females of other fruit fly species live for only two or three months, QFF females are unique in that they can live up to a year, ...
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