Study seeks to slow ripening in bananas through genetics in China

Published Jun 21, 2024

Tridge summary

Researchers at South China Agricultural University are using genetics to improve the ripening process in bananas, which can cause economic losses due to excessive softening and bruising. They have identified the genetic regulators "MabHLH28" as a potential key to improving post-harvest fruit handling. By binding to the promoters of softening-related genes, MabHLH28 enhances their expression, accelerating the ripening process in bananas and tomatoes. The research has the potential to control the ripening process, improving post-harvest quality and extending the shelf life of bananas.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

Ripening usually determines the shelf life and market value of fruits, since excessive softening can make storage and transportation difficult, causing economic losses to exporters and producers. Bananas, one of the most consumed fruits in the world, pose additional problems in this regard, because they ripen quickly if not refrigerated. Additionally, their skin bruises easily, which affects the appearance of the product. To solve this problem, researchers from the State Key Laboratory of Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agrobioresources at South China Agricultural University are studying genetics to improve the ripening process in bananas. Related news: Banana exports from Ecuador would rebound Scientists discovered that genetic regulators such as "MabHLH28" could be the key to improving post-harvest fruit handling. MabHLH28, specifically, binds to the promoters of softening-related genes, thus enhancing their expression. Functional experiments demonstrated that ...
Source: MXfruit
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