News

The Ministry of Agriculture proposed a six-month ban on rice exports from Russia

Grains, Cereal & Legumes
Rice
Russia
Regulation & Compliances
Published Nov 29, 2023

Tridge summary

The Russian Ministry of Agriculture has proposed a temporary ban on the export of rice and rice cereals from January 1 to June 30, 2024, with certain exceptions including humanitarian assistance and military support. The draft resolution is currently posted on the federal portal of draft regulatory legal acts. Additionally, there are plans to establish a tariff quota for the export of wheat, barley, corn, and rye to non-Eurasian Economic Union states, with a volume of 24 million tons and validity from February 15 to June 30, 2024.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

“Establish from January 1 to June 30, 2024 inclusive, a temporary ban on the export of rice and rice cereals from the Russian Federation,” says the document, developed by the Ministry of Agriculture. According to the draft, the temporary ban does not apply to rice exported from Russia to the countries of the Eurasian Economic Union for the purpose of providing humanitarian assistance to foreign countries on the basis of decisions of the Russian government, exported within the framework of international intergovernmental agreements and international transit transport starting and ending outside the territory of Russia, as well as rice moved between parts of the territory of the Russian Federation through the territories of foreign states. In addition, the ban does not apply to rice exported from Russia as supplies, exported in order to support the activities of military units of the Russian Federation located on the territories of foreign states, in order to support the activities ...
Source: Kvedomosti
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