News

US prepares for 'possibility' of increased risk of bird flu in humans

Published May 25, 2024

Tridge summary

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the United States is preparing for potential human infections of the H5N1 bird flu virus, following two cases in individuals who were in contact with infected cows. Although the virus does not easily spread between people, the CDC warns it could become more infectious for humans. The risk to humans is currently low, and there is no evidence of human-to-human transmission. The latest case was reported in a Michigan dairy worker who recovered after being monitored. This is the third instance of H5N1 bird flu in people in the United States. The CDC is working with state health departments to monitor for other possible cases in individuals who may have been exposed to infected birds or animals.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

Washington, May 24 (EFE).- United States health authorities indicated this Friday that they are preparing for the “possibility of a greater risk to human health” of bird flu infections, after two cases detected in people who were in contact with infected cows. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) warned this Friday that although the H5N1 virus currently circulating does not have the ability to spread easily between people, "it is possible that it could change" and could infect easy for humans. However, the federal health agency reiterated that the risk of bird flu in humans in the United States "is currently low" and there is no evidence of human-to-human transmission in the country. Last Wednesday, the CDC reported that the second human case of bird flu was detected in a person who was in contact with dairy cows infected with this virus. The case was identified in a dairy worker in Michigan who was regularly exposed to cattle infected with bird flu. After being ...
By clicking “Accept Cookies,” I agree to provide cookies for statistical and personalized preference purposes. To learn more about our cookies, please read our Privacy Policy.