USDA report shows H5N1 dairy cases not caused by migrant birds in the United States

Published Jun 22, 2024

Tridge summary

A recent report by the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has found that the spread of the H5N1 virus among dairy farms is likely to be due to human and equipment movement rather than wild birds. The spread is linked to interstate cattle movements and local spread between dairy farms. The report also highlights that 50% of the affected farms used shared trucks and trailers, half of which were not cleaned before use. Additionally, 30% of employees visited or worked at other dairies within 30 days of the outbreak. The report stresses the importance of strong biosecurity measures.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

A report from USDA shows the H5N1 virus was probably spread to more dairy farms by humans and equipment, and not wild birds. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service says the spread of the virus is linked to interstate cattle movements and further local spread between dairy farms. The report says 50% of the affected farms used trucks and trailers that are shared with other farms, and half of those farms did not clean the vehicles prior to use. Thirty percent of the dairies’ employees also visited or worked at other dairies within 30 days of the outbreak. APHIS surveyed affected farms and found 20% of them received cattle within 30 days of seeing clinical signs, and 60% of farms continued to move animals off the farm after the onset of clinical signs. All of the farms observed wild birds, but just 29% of them saw sick or dead ...
By clicking “Accept Cookies,” I agree to provide cookies for statistical and personalized preference purposes. To learn more about our cookies, please read our Privacy Policy.