News

Anglers urged to fish out invasive bass from Campbell River lake in Canada

Published Apr 23, 2024

Tridge summary

In a bid to protect native fish populations, the province, in collaboration with the A-Tlegay Fisheries Society and the B.C. Conservation Foundation, is launching an initiative to remove invasive smallmouth bass from Echo Lake near Campbell River. Utilizing gill nets and electrofishing, the effort seeks to halt the spread of this species, known for its detrimental impact on local ecosystems due to its competitive nature and high reproductive rate. Anglers are being called upon to aid in this endeavor by catching, freezing, and reporting any smallmouth bass catches. This action is part of a larger strategy to manage invasive species throughout B.C., emphasizing the illegal status of transferring live fish between water bodies and the severe penalties associated with it.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

The province will start setting gill nets and using “electrofishing” in Echo Lake near Campbell River this month in an attempt to eradicate an invasive sports fish. Anglers are also urged to cast their lines to catch as many smallmouth bass as possible, freeze their catches and report them to fisheries officials. Smallmouth bass were introduced into the lake recently and prey heavily on smaller trout and other fish, said Sarah Unrau, a biologist for the A-Tlegay Fisheries Society, a collaboration of five area First Nations that is assisting the province in the eradication effort. Unrau said it isn’t known how many of the small mouth bass are in Echo Lake, about 15 minutes from Campbell River along the Gold River Highway. But she said there is concern the bass could make their way to the nearby Campbell River watershed and damage populations of trout and salmon. The ministry said smallmouth bass, which can out-compete native fish species, were introduced illegally into Echo Lake. ...
By clicking “Accept Cookies,” I agree to provide cookies for statistical and personalized preference purposes. To learn more about our cookies, please read our Privacy Policy.