News

Another study from Norway shows salmon farms pose low disease risk to wild fish

Frozen Whole Pacific Salmon
Published Apr 10, 2024

Tridge summary

Recent studies, including one from Norway's Institute of Marine Research and others from Canada and the U.S., have found minimal to no viral and bacterial transmission from farmed fish to wild fish, supporting the notion that salmon farming poses little risk to wild stocks. This conclusion is backed by numerous scientific studies and is echoed in a collaborative report by British Columbia’s salmon farmers and First Nation partners. Meanwhile, the Federal government of Canada is deliberating the renewal of salmon farming licenses in British Columbia, following the closure of 40% of salmon farms since 2020 due to activist pressure. These closures have led to increased carbon emissions and significant job losses, impacting rural, coastal, and Indigenous communities. Prior to these closures, the salmon farming sector was a major contributor to BC's economy, supporting thousands of jobs and producing a significant amount of salmon meals annually, with all operations having the support of local First Nations communities.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

No apparent relationship between the prevalence of virus infection in wild salmon and fish farms states a new Norwegian study, reaffirming conclusions of Canadian and U.S. scientists. By Fabian DawsonSeaWestNews A new study in Norway has found that there is little viral and bacterial transmission from farmed fish to wild fish, reaffirming the conclusions of Canadian and U.S. government scientists who researched the impacts of salmon farming in the Pacific Northwest. The study by Norway’s Institute of Marine Research, conducted in farming-intensive areas, is part of an annual monitoring program by the Norwegian Food Safety Authority, reported Fishfarmingexpert.com. The current findings are in line with previous monitoring reports in Norway that showed no apparent relationship between the prevalence of virus infection in wild salmon and the fish farms. “The results of the monitoring programme indicate that there is a very low incidence of infection in migrating wild salmon and sea ...
Source: SeaWest News
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