News

Australia’s February barley and sorghum exports plummet

Barley
Sorghum
Australia
Market & Price Trends
Published Apr 11, 2024

Tridge summary

Australia witnessed a significant decline in its barley and sorghum exports in February, with feed barley exports falling by 38 percent and malting barley by 63 percent from January, as reported by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Sorghum exports also decreased by 51 percent. Despite these declines, largely attributed to the Chinese New Year holiday's impact on logistics and the early season timing, China continues to be the primary market for Australia's barley, while Japan leads in sorghum imports. However, the outlook remains positive with about 90 percent of Australia's barley export expectations already secured, indicating a strong demand, especially from China, in the upcoming months.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

Australia exported 498,382 tonnes of barley and 55,755t of sorghum in February, according to the latest data from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Feed barley exports at 379,875t fell 38 percent from the 609,217t shipped in January, while malting barley exports at 118,507t were down 63pc from the 316,041t shipped in January. Sorghum shipments at 55,755t also posted a big drop, down 51pc from the 114,661t exported in January. China was the major destination for feed barley, taking 272,082t, or 72pc, of total shipments, followed by Japan on 100,296t, and Thailand on 2172t. China on 111,159t was also the destination for the vast majority of malting barley exports, followed by Singapore on 4703t and Thailand on 1113t. Japan on 24,603t was the largest destination for February-shipped sorghum, followed closely by China on 24,163t and Taiwan on 4921t. Flexi Grain pool manager Sam Roache said the drop in barley volume shipped in February has come as no surprise. “That’s per ...
By clicking “Accept Cookies,” I agree to provide cookies for statistical and personalized preference purposes. To learn more about our cookies, please read our Privacy Policy.