News

Rise in South African citrus volumes predicted

Fresh Orange
Published Apr 2, 2024

Tridge summary

The Citrus Growers’ Association of South Africa has announced an expected increase in citrus exports, including lemons, oranges, and grapefruit, despite challenges such as rising costs, load shedding, and poor public infrastructure. This growth is driven by younger trees maturing and the reopening of exports to significant markets like China. However, there's a concern that higher local processing returns could decrease orange exports by up to 5%, potentially affecting the overall positive forecast. The industry's resilience is evident in the notable rise in lemon exports and optimistic projections for other citrus fruits.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

As citrus exports from South Africa kick-off in earnest this month, with shipments of lemons, grapefruit and early soft citrus dominating, the industry is preparing for yet another rise in volumes. “Overall, an increase in export volume is expected,” confirmed Citrus Growers’ Association (CGA) chief executive Justin Chadwick. “This is a testament to the resilience of South African citrus growers, producing more citrus under challenging circumstances, such as steep increases in input costs, load shedding and deteriorating public infrastructure,” he commented. ”This increase is also a result of younger trees coming into production across several regions.” The CGA’s first forecast said that 37.9m cartons of lemons would be exported, an increase of 7 per cent year-on-year. “This continues the upward curve of lemon exports, which has more than doubled since 2016,” Chadwick outlined. Orange exports are also expected to increase, with predictions showing 4 per cent growth in Navels at ...
Source: Fruitnet
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