News

World: Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in US, Australia dairy report, and neutral U.S. Cattle on Feed report

Meat
Dairy
United States
Market & Price Trends
Published Nov 25, 2023

Tridge summary

The USDA has confirmed additional cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza in commercial poultry operations in South Dakota and California. Efforts are underway to contain and mitigate the spread of the virus, which poses a significant threat to the poultry industry. In other news, a study reveals the impact of African swine fever on China's pork market, showing that the country lost an estimated 27.9 million metric tons of pork production during a 30-month cycle, leading to price increases and increased imports of pork.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed three additional cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in commercial poultry operations in Edmunds County, South Dakota. The affected flocks include 30,100 commercial turkey breeder replacements, 19,200 commercial turkey breeder hens, and 33,400 commercial meat birds. This brings the total number of affected commercial flocks in South Dakota to 13, with a combined total of 451,500 birds. Besides the South Dakota cases, USDA also confirmed HPAI at a commercial duck breeder operation in Fresno County, California, involving 23,400 birds. The continued spread of HPAI in poultry operations is a concern for the poultry industry, as the virus can lead to significant economic losses. Efforts are being made to contain and mitigate the spread of the virus, including depopulation of affected flocks and increased biosecurity measures in poultry operations. Milk production for 2024 in Australia is forecast to ...
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