News

Finland sees decline during ESBL monitoring

Meat
Finland
Published Sep 23, 2021

Tridge summary

Food chain monitoring in Finland has found a low level of an indicator of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in meat and animals, according to recent review of data. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and AmpC-producing E. coli bacteria were reported for broilers, chicken meat, and beef in 2020. Incidence of ESBL and AmpC-producing bacteria has been lower in Finland than the average level in European countries since screening of retail food products began in 2015.

Original content

E. coli are indicator bacteria for antibiotic resistance levels in Gram-negative bacteria and used for AMR surveillance in humans and food-producing animals. ESBL and AmpC-producing E. coli are of concern because these enzymes show resistance to a range of antibiotics, limiting treatment options. Declining trend Prevalence in broilers for slaughter and domestic broiler meat has decreased significantly in the country between 2016 and 2020. They were present in slaughterhouse broilers in 2016 and 2018 at a rate of 13 to 14 percent but in 2020 they were detected in less than 0.5 percent of the examined samples. In domestic chicken meat for retail sale, these bacteria were found in 22 percent of samples in 2016, 15 percent in 2018 but only 0.5 percent in 2020. Since 2017, ESBL and AmpC-producing bacteria have not been detected in flocks coming to Finland for broiler production from abroad. In 2020, ESBL or AmpC-producing E. coli was detected in 3 percent of cattle for slaughter. In ...
By clicking “Accept Cookies,” I agree to provide cookies for statistical and personalized preference purposes. To learn more about our cookies, please read our Privacy Policy.