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In the US, hamburgers were tested for avian influenza

Published May 21, 2024

Tridge summary

A study by the US Department of Agriculture has found that properly cooked hamburger patties cannot contain the H5N1 avian influenza virus. The study involved injecting an inactivated H5N1 mimic into ground beef patties and cooking them at specific temperatures. The USDA also tested 30 samples of ground beef from retail stores and did not detect the virus. However, the FDA found H5N1 particles in about 20% of dairy product samples, but no viable virus was present. The CDC is now monitoring wastewater for the influenza A virus, with high levels detected in Illinois and Florida, despite the lack of detection in cows in these states. The CDC is also urging states to provide protective equipment to slaughterhouse and dairy workers.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by Tridge's proprietary AI model for informational purposes.

Original content

Properly cooked medium- to deep-rare hamburger patties will not contain the H5N1 avian influenza virus, according to a US Department of Agriculture study. An inactivated H5N1 mimic was injected into ground beef patties. After frying at a temperature of 63-71ºС, the cutlets became suitable for eating. Even in the case of cooking cutlets with blood - when fried at about 50ºC - the number of inactivated virus particles is reduced, reports Reuters, citing the results of a study by the United States Department of Agriculture. Previously, the US Department of Agriculture tested 30 samples of ground beef taken from retail stores and did not find the avian influenza virus in them, concluding that meat in stores is safe. At the same time, scientists suggested that the outbreak of avian influenza virus among US dairy cows was larger because the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) found H5N1 particles in about 20% of dairy product samples collected at retail. At the same time, the FDA ...
Source: Milknews
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