News

US: Grant awarded to study tomato-killer pathogen

Fresh Bell Pepper
Vegetables
United States
Innovation & Technology
Fresh Tomato
Sustainability & Environmental Impact
Published Nov 25, 2023

Tridge summary

Dr. Tuan Tran, a biologist at the University of South Alabama, has been awarded a $40,000 grant to study Ralstonia solananacearum, a soil-based bacterium that causes wilt in crops. The pathogen is difficult to eradicate and poses a significant threat to crops worldwide. Tran's research focuses on the genetic diversity of Ralstonia and its interaction with plants' immune systems.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

Not just ones we eat, but flowers as well. And once it’s there, you cannot get rid of it. So crop rotation basically doesn’t work. Farmers would just abandon a field when they got bacterial wilt. “Ralstonia is relevant everywhere you go on every continent. From Asia and Africa to North and South America. If we’re not careful, it can get out and destroy other plants, and there’s no effective way to control them. Ralstonia can live in water for decades.” Dr. Tuan Tran, assistant professor of biology at the University of South Alabama, was awarded a $40,000 grant by the USDA and the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries to study a soil-based bacterium that causes wilt in crops such as tomatoes, peppers and potatoes. This year, Tran was awarded a $40,000 grant to study the genetic diversity of Ralstonia by the USDA and the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries. He was also part of an international team that published a recent article in Plant Physiology, a ...
Source: Hortidaily
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