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The Groundfish Forum predicts that global wild-caught whitefish supplies will remain flat in 2024

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Published Nov 3, 2023

Tridge summary

The International Groundfish Forum predicts that the global supply of wild-caught whitefish will remain steady in 2024, with a slight decrease of 1,000 metric tons compared to 2023. Some species, such as Alaska pollock, will see an increase in supply, while others like Atlantic cod will experience a significant drop. Overall, there will be a decrease in the supply of Atlantic cod, haddock, and Pacific cod, while species like Atlantic redfish and hoki will see an increase in available volume.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

The International Groundfish Forum, an organization representing the global groundfish sector, is predicting the global supply of wild-caught whitefish will remain flat in 2024 as some species see gains while others see big drops. The forum, which met in Athens, Greece in October, predicted that the total supply of wild-caught whitefish would be 7.042 million metric tons (MT), down just 1,000 MT from the 7.043 million MT available in 2023. The slight decrease still represents a higher supply than 2022, when the industry had 6.938 million MT to work with. While overall supply will remain flat, the forum predicted some fisheries will sustain large drops, while others will gain volume.Alaska pollock, the largest wild-caught whitefish species by volume, will see a big increase in available catch in 2024 compared to 2023. Across the major sources of the species, the Groundfish Forum is projecting the supply in 2024 will sit at just under 3.8 million MT, up from the 3.7 million MT ...
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