News

Record heat chokes Japanese vegetable production

Vegetables
Japan
Sustainability & Environmental Impact
Market & Price Trends
Published Sep 28, 2023

Tridge summary

Record summer heat in 2023 has damaged summer vegetables and delayed the planting of autumn and winter vegetables in Japan, threatening domestic vegetable supplies. Japan, which is almost self-sufficient in fresh vegetable consumption, may turn to imports to make up for potential shortfalls, with the United States being a leading supplier of onion, celery, and lettuce. The heatwaves have affected agricultural production across Japan, with low yields and quality issues reported for various crops such as tomatoes, cucumbers, edamame, and soybeans.
Disclaimer: The above summary was generated by a state-of-the-art LLM model and is intended for informational purposes only. It is recommended that readers refer to the original article for more context.

Original content

The record summer heat of 2023 has damaged summer vegetables and delayed the planting of autumn and winter vegetables in Japan. Although Japan is almost self-sufficient in fresh vegetable consumption, it can turn to imports to make up for potential supply shortfalls. The United States is a leading supplier to Japan for onion, celery and lettuce. Among Japanese agricultural products, fresh vegetables have one of the highest self-sufficiency rates, at approximately 95%. Meanwhile, only around 5% matters, those that do not produce or those that face a temporary shortage of domestic supply. According to industry reports, record heat waves in the summer of 2023 are affecting agricultural production across Japan. The average temperature between June and August was approximately 1.76 degrees Celsius higher than the 1991-2020 average, marking the largest temperature increase on record. Summer and autumn vegetables, currently in the harvest phase, have recorded low yields due to poor ...
Source: MXfruit
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